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Kertesz, M., Humphreys, C. & Larance, L.Y. (2021). Interventions for women who use force in a family context: an Australian Practice Framework. Melbourne: University of Melbourne.

Abstract:

This Practice Framework isdesigned as a brief guide for practitioners and program designers to the principles and intervention style deemed essential for working with this population. It is best read in the context of a program curriculum such as the Positive Shift Curriculum or the University of Melbourne research reports on this topic.

The framework is based on a research program about women who use force in a family context, which has included academic researchers from the University of Melbourne and Curtin University and service providers and users (Baptcare and Berry Street).

Researchers: Kertesz, M., Humphreys, C. & Larance, L.Y.

Year: 2021

Warren, A., Martin, R., Chung, D. (2020) Women who use force: Final Report. Volume 3 – National Workforce Survey. Melbourne: University of Melbourne

Abstract:

This is the final report (3 volumes) of a research program that has developed the Australian knowledge base about women who use force in a family context, and appropriate service responses. The research was funded by the Department of Social Services.

Volume 3 reports on a national workforce survey which found varying understandings and definitions of what constitutes women’s use of force and the extent to which it is considered different from men. The report identifies that there is some urgency in building knowledge about this area of work, as women who use force are seen regularly by study participants in their work.

Researchers: Warren, A., Martin, R., Chung, D.

Year: 2020

Warren, A., Martin, R., Chung, D. (2020) Women who use force: Final Report. Volume 2 – International Literature Review. Melbourne: University of Melbourne

Abstract:

This is the final report (3 volumes) of a research program that has developed the Australian knowledge base about women who use force in a family context, and appropriate service responses. The research was funded by the Department of Social Services.

Volume 2 reviews the international literature about women who use force in a family context. Women’s use of force cannot be categorised in the ways that men’s violence has been understood, differing in motivation, intent and impact. 

Researchers: Warren, A., Martin, R., Chung, D.

Year: 2020

Kertesz, M., Humphreys, C., Ovenden, G., Spiteri-Staines, A. (2020) Women who use force: Final Report. Volume 1 – Executive Summary, Positive Shift Program, Evaluation of Positive Shift, and Practice Framework. Melbourne: University of Melbourne

Abstract:

This is the final report (3 volumes) of a research program that has developed the Australian knowledge base about women who use force in a family context, and appropriate service responses. The research was funded by the Department of Social Services.

Volume 1 contains a practice framework for intervening with this population, a description and evaluation of +SHIFT (a group work and case management program for women who use force) and the executive summary.

Researchers: Kertesz, M., Humphreys, C., Ovenden, G., Spiteri-Staines, A.

Year: 2020

Isobe, J., Healey, L. & Humphreys, C. (2020). A critical interpretive synthesis of the intersection of domestic violence with parental issues of mental health and substance use. Health and Social Care in the Community, 28(5), 1394–1407.

Abstract:

A critical interpretive synthesis (CIS) methodology was used with the aim of informing practice with children and families when domestic and family violence (DFV) and parental issues relating to alcohol and other drugs (AOD) and mental health (MH) are also present. A CIS is grounded in the literature, but includes questioning of the literature in order to problematise gaps, contradictions and constructions of issues. A review of the literature from 2010 to 2018 was conducted with the structured search strategy identifying 40 relevant research articles. Synthesis and critique of these articles revealed three mutually informative themes through which to understand the literature and how it can inform practice. They were as follows: differences in theoretical approaches and client focus; complexity of system’s collaboration; and practices converging on mothers. Taken together, these themes facilitated the development of the synthesising construct: strengthening intersection between DFV, AOD and MH sectors. Attention to practice at multiple levels that responds to the dynamics of gender and the differing impacts of violence was often lacking, particularly in the context of heightened child protection concerns where collaboration between sectors is needed. Both promising and problematic practices relating to gender dynamics and accountability converged on mothers. While there were exceptions, generally, there was an absence of engagement with, and recognition of, the impacts of fathers’ patterns of using violence and control on adult and child survivors. Promising practice related to the strengthening of the mother–child relationship and attention to MH and its intersection with domestic violence. Strengthening the intersections between DFV, AOD and MH practices with attention to keeping the perpetrator of violence in view is critical to overcoming the poor practice that can occur when sectors are siloed from each other.

To view the original publication, click here.

Researchers: Isobe, J., Healey, L. & Humphreys, C.

Year: 2020

Kertesz, M. Ramamurthy, A., Fogden, L., & Humphreys, C. (2019). Children and Mothers in Mind Independent Evaluation 2018-19 Participant and Facilitator Feedback: Final Report. Melbourne: University of Melbourne.

The final evaluation report for Children and Mothers in Mind (CMIM), a group program for mothers and pre-school children who have experienced family violence in the past, and focuses on interview-based findings about the participants’ experiences of the program.

Researchers: Kertesz, M. Ramamurthy, A., Fogden, L., & Humphreys, C.
Year: 2019

Kertesz, M., Ovenden, G., & Humphreys, C. (2019). Independent Evaluation of +SHIFT at Tarrengower Prison. Melbourne: University of Melbourne.

In the context of a dominant pattern of male violence perpetrated against women, there are some women who use force in their intimate relationships, and who are identified as perpetrators of violence. This report evaluates the Positive Shift program, as delivered within Tarrengower Prison for women. Positive Shift is is a 16-session group work and case support program for women who use force, which takes a therapeutic, gender-responsive, trauma-informed approach, building on the strengths of more traditional survivor support groups.

Researchers: Kertesz, M., Ovenden, G., & Humphreys, C.
Year: 2019

Spiteri‐Staines, A., Diemer, K., Absler, & D., Humphreys, C., (2019) Keeping Safe Together: Independent evaluation, Summary of Findings and Recommendations. Melbourne, University of Melbourne.

Summary of Findings and Recommendations of the Keeping Safe Together independent pilot program evaluation. The document describes key findings for children and young people, women and men.

Researchers: Spiteri‐Staines, A., Diemer, K., Absler, D., & Humphreys, C.

Year: 2019

Diemer, K., Humphreys, C., Fogden, L., Gallant, D., Spiteri-Staines, A., Bornemisza, A., & Vercoe, E. (2020). Caring Dads Program: Helping fathers value their children (Research report, 02/2020). Melbourne, VIC.

Abstract:

In Australia, there are few services helping men who have used violence that specifically focus on improving parenting practices. Caring Dads is Australia’s first evidence-based behaviour-change program helping fathers who have used violence to improve their relationship with their children. In an evaluation of the trial conducted by the University of Melbourne, the Caring Dads program has been shown to have a positive impact on fathers’ parenting and co-parenting practices, reduce the risk of children’s further exposure to domestic and family violence, increase fathers’ ability to identify the impact of their aggressive behaviour on their children, and improve men’s responses to people more generally.

Researchers: Diemer, K., Humphreys, C., Fogden, L., Gallant, D., Spiteri-Staines, A., Bornemisza, A., & Vercoe, E.

Year: 2020

Gallant, D., Andrews, S., Humphreys, C., Diemer, K., Ellis, D., Burton, J., & McIvor, R. (2017). Aboriginal men’s programs tackling family violence: A scoping review. Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues, 20(2), 48-68.

Abstract: Academic and community research identifies that Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are at a greater risk of being exposed to family violence than non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. While much of the literature has had a clear focus on the protection of Aboriginal women and children, there is a dearth of research that has examined the nature and efficacy of Aboriginal programs that seek to address men’s use of violence. In recent times, governments, policy makers, and community organisations have all sought to gain a greater understanding of how men’s group programs, that are specifically aimed at tackling family violence, are addressing these issues.

Utilising a scoping review methodology, this paper examines and summarises the available Australian and international literature available pertaining to these programs. Furthermore, from the findings of the scoping review the authors present a conceptual model for the purpose of discussing the complexities of tackling family violence issues in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men’s group programs.

To view the original publication, click here

Researchers: Gallant, D., S. Andrews, C. Humphreys, K. Diemer, D. Ellis, J. Burton, W. Harrison, R. Briggs, C. Black, A. Bamblett, S. Torres-Carne and R. McIvor.

Year: 2017